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Why One safety switch isn't enough

Posted on 8 April, 2017 at 20:55 Comments comments (0)



Every year, 15 people are killed in Australian homes in electrical accidents that could have been prevented if a safety switch was fitted on the electrical circuit.


As many as 20 times that number of people are hospitalised with serious electrical injuries and burns. Find out how you can protect yourself in the free Switch Thinking Report.



Safety switches - also known as residual current circuit breakers (RCCBs) or residual current devices (RCDs) - have been in common use in Australia for over 20 years. However, feedback to Master Electricians through members and directly from the public indicates there is a high level of confusion as to what safety switches do.


Safety switches are different to circuit breakers and surge protectors. A safety switch will detect a current leaking to earth and will trip the circuit within as little as 30 milliseconds, and no more than 300 milliseconds. This stops the flow of electricity through the body of the person in contact with the circuit, in less than the length of a critical heartbeat.


Safety Switch


Safety switches stop the flow of electricity on a circuit if it is detected to be leaking to earth. They are required by law to be fitted to the power and lighting circuits of all homes, however are rarely installed on all other circuits. They can be distinguished from circuit breakers and surge protectors by a button marked test, located on the front of the device.


Circuit Breaker


Circuit breakers and fuses are designed to protect the electrical cables and fittings of the home from being overloaded or damaged. They cut power when electrical wiring in the home has too much current running through it. Circuit breakers rarely protect humans from electrocution or electric shock.


Surge Protector


Can be fitted to switchboards to safeguard appliances against a spike in electrical voltage caused by a lightning strike or other external event. Some power boards or extension leads also have this function, however these devices do not offer any protection against electrical death or injury.


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New Smoke alarm Laws

Posted on 8 April, 2017 at 20:15 Comments comments (0)

New smoke alarm laws now apply in Queensland New and substantially renovated homes are now required to have interconnected Australian Standard (AS) 3786-2014 photoelectric smoke alarms in all bedrooms, in hallways where bedrooms are connected, and on each and every level of the residence. This applies to homes where building applications were lodged after 1 January 2017. Requirements for other homes will be phased in over 10 years. Interconnected AS 3786-2014 photoelectric smoke alarms will be required from: 1 January 2022 in all homes leased and sold 1 January 2027 in all other homes. To comply with the new laws homeowners can install either hardwired 240V smoke alarms or non-removable 10-year battery smoke alarms. However, any existing hardwired 240V smoke alarm must be replaced with a hardwired 240V photoelectric smoke alarm. The installation of hardwired 240V smoke alarms must be performed by a licenced electrician. In existing homes, it is possible to have a combination of smoke alarms, which can be 240V or battery operated and interconnectivity which can be both wired and wireless. For more information please contact us on 0409 623 970.


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